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Travel and Leisure

Hampta Pass Circuit Trek

The Hampta Pass Circuit walk in Himachal Pradesh is one of those incredible hikes that takes you to a completely different world of breathtaking scenery and wildlife. This walk will take you on a journey of self-discovery and meaning. The Hampta valley, deep in Himachal Pradesh, has yet to be discovered by the commercial sector. This allows us to go into the outdoors, which is still pristine and innocent.

The spectacular trail winds through dense oak and pine trees, occasionally opening up to reveal its great expanse. The path is also accompanied by glistening streams that flow down from the Himalayas. The vast environment resembles a gaping maw, with streams running through it and massive mountains surrounding it on all sides.
In the summer, the Hampta Pass Circuit Trek is extremely popular due to its beautiful green landscape. The winters in Hampta, on the other hand, are breathtaking, with the entire valley blanketed in shimmering snow. Winter is the greatest time to visit the Hampta Valley for those who don’t want to trek in the summer but still want to take in the scenery.

The beautiful waterfalls are one of the nicest things Hampta circuit hiking has to offer. All of the waterfalls you’ll come across on your trip will astound you with their breathtaking splendour. These waterfalls are also ideal for taking a break and spending some quiet time alone.
Another advantage of the Hampta Pass Circuit walk is that it begins in Manali, one of Himachal Pradesh’s most lovely towns. Manali is a charming tiny hamlet in the Kullu Valley, with the Beas Kund river running alongside it. What distinguishes Manali from other hill towns is that it serves as a gateway to adventure activities in the Solang Valley and trekking in the Parvati Valley.

Manali also has a thriving collection of cafes and eateries to sample. The worn-out old traditional streets and ancient structures capture your soul and provide you with an opportunity to witness a beautiful blend of contemporary and history.

Also see : Best Trekking Backpack and About Tirthan Valley

It is critical to understand how to get to the Hampta Pass Circuit Trek. Fly into the nearest Bhuntar airport, which is 52 kilometres from Manali, to reach the Hampta Pass. Then take a private taxi to the Jobra campground through Bhuntar to Manali. There are many overnight buses from Delhi to Manali if you choose to travel by road. Your journey begins when you arrive at the Jobra campground, which is at an elevation of 9800 feet. Then, at a height of 10400 feet, you can go to Chika via hairpin curves and steep roads. The drive takes about 3 hours, but you won’t notice because you’ll be entranced by the magnificent green countryside and snow-capped peaks. In addition, the Jobra Base Camp has a large number of campers and motels, so guests will have no trouble getting food or lodging.

If you go back a few decades, the Hampta Pass was a common route for traders from Spiti to enter Manali for business. The Hampta Pass route is still quite popular among trekkers today. The Hampta Pass, which overlooks the twin mountain peaks of Bara Shigri and Chita Shigri, is bordered on all sides by melting glaciers and steep slopes. The ascent to the pass is strenuous and dangerous, but the breathtaking views of the surrounding mountains will make it worthwhile. You might even come across the Himalayan black bears that wander the slopes if you’re lucky.

The paths of Hampta Pass, which are a circuit trip, begin at Jobra (2743 metres) and circle back to Chikka (3048 meters). On Day 1, you’ll travel a distance of 3 kilometres in 2 hours, using a rather straightforward path.

We begin our journey by walking through a forest filled with massive oak and maple trees before arriving at a wide valley where the calm Rani Nallah River runs on your right.

On the second day, we hike from Chikka to Balu Ka Gehra (3600 meters). The journey is 5 kilometres long and takes approximately 7-8 hours to complete. Because of the regular rains, the trail achieves a gentle elevation for the first 2 kilometres and is likely to be covered in slush. The trek’s first challenge arrives halfway through, at the 2.5-kilometer mark. It’s a bridge over a river.
The third day of the hike is the longest and most difficult. We will travel a distance of 9 kilometres in 9 hours on this day. The route starts at Balu Ka Gehra and climbs steeply to the Hampta Pass (4200 metres) before ending at Shea Goru (3900 meters).

The path from Balu Ka Gehra is entirely made up of boulders and rocks. Because of the river stream, the first two kilometres are paved in a zig-zag pattern. The elevation rises steeply for the next three kilometres, and the terrain changes dramatically, becoming snow-covered. This stretch marks the end of your greenery and water sources. The final kilometer-long rise to the Pass is the toughest and most difficult part of the day. Soft snow on the trails slows you down even more, demanding more energy and time.

The third day of the hike is the longest and most difficult. We will travel a distance of 9 kilometres in 9 hours on this day. The route starts at Balu Ka Gehra and climbs steeply to the Hampta Pass (4200 metres) before ending at Shea Goru (3900 meters).

The path from Balu Ka Gehra is entirely made up of boulders and rocks. Because of the river stream, the first two kilometres are paved in a zig-zag pattern. The elevation rises steeply for the next three kilometres, and the terrain changes dramatically, becoming snow-covered. This stretch marks the end of your greenery and water sources. The final kilometer-long rise to the Pass is the toughest and most difficult part of the day. Soft snow on the trails slows you down even more, demanding more energy and time.

The descent from the Pass is just as difficult as the ascent. The Hampta Pass is a 50-meter piece of road that serves as a doorway to the Spiti and Lahaul regions. From the Pass, the routes immediately plummet at a 50-degree steep grade. Gravel, loose sand, and massive rocks make navigation more difficult. To go through this section, you’ll need the right tactics and gears.

During the rainy season, this 3-kilometer stretch can be very difficult. The sand gets mushy and slippery as it settles. The wind’s force can also cause the path’s massive rocks to roll down the slope. To traverse this section, you’ll need a good understanding of the terrain and the right skillset, especially if it’s raining. After 3 kilometres, the trail flattens out and leads to Shea Goru, the third campsite.

On the fourth day, we’ll trek from Shea Goru to Chhatru (3350 metres), our final campsite. We’ll cover 5 kilometres in 4 hours. While the trails are simple to follow, a second river crossing presents a difficulty today.

You’ll notice that the currents are stronger and the water is colder than before. To cross this stream, we usually use a human chain strategy. On days when the currents are particularly strong, we may also utilise a rope. This activity should be carried out with sufficient expertise or under the supervision of an expert.

After crossing the river, the trail descends gently to the final campsite, which is conveniently located near a highway. Many cabs can be found near the campsite that will transport you to Chandra Taal, a high-altitude lake.

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